Newsletters

Newsletter 1 – January 2014

Follow TALES on www.storiesforlearning.eu

[from March 2014 on]

 

 TALES: Introducing Oral and Digital Storytelling in the Classroom

TALES is a Comenius Multilateral Project that wants to introduce oral and digital storytelling and the use of storytelling techniques as a pedagogical tool in school education. TALES started in November 2013 and will last 2 years.

The end target groups of TALES are 6 – 18 year old pupils and students. For these groups the project focuses on the development of key competences through storytelling e.g. verbal and communication skills in the mother tongue and in a foreign language, intercultural understanding, digital competences, imagination and creativity, cultural awareness and expression, etc.

In order to reach these groups TALES targets initial teacher training students, teachers at school, teacher trainers as well as curriculum developers, storytellers cooperating with schools, decision-makers in the education sector, scholars in the education sector, interested in using oral and digital storytelling in education.

The consortium will perform a thorough analysis of the state of the art of storytelling as an educational tool. In a next phase a number of good practices will be identified, analyzed and reported. This background work will serve as the basis for the development of a number of cognitive tools about how to effectively introduce storytelling into the classroom. The last stage of the project will see carefully planned and monitored pilots in schools being performed, one per partner, with the cooperation of professional storytellers, in order to test the approach developed during the preparatory phase.

The stories will have a digital interactive version, created using a special dedicated authoring tool made available to schools by the partnership. In addition, a competition on digital storytelling will be launched in the partners’ countries during school year 2014-15. All the stories will be collected in an innovative exploratory portal, available from the project’s website. Based on all these experiences the partnership will produce reports, educational materials and above all a manual for the benefit of all the target groups. The manual will be in English and in each partner language.

Project partners:

Landcommanderij Alden Biesen (BE) – coordinator

The Languages Company (UK)

Katholieke Hogeschool Limburg (BE)

Tallinn University Haapsalu College (EE)

Oslo and Akershus University College of applied sciences (NO)

Pädagogische Hochschule Steiermark (AT)

Ouvir e Contar, Associação de Contadores de Histórias (PT)

Politecnico di Milano (IT)

For more info please contact the project partners through the website: www.storiesforlearning.eu.

[from March, 2014 on]

Newsletter 2 – October 2014

Follow TALES on www.storiesforlearning.eu

 

 TALES: Introducing Oral and Digital Storytelling in the Classroom

Storytelling is a powerful way to engage students as well as to foster the acquisition of key competences, like verbal and communication skills in the mother tongue, skills in a second or foreign language, imagination, creativity, learning to learn, intercultural understanding, etc.

But how is the art of storytelling (both traditional and digital) taken into account in teachers’ training as well as in school practice, across Europe today?

The TALES project has run an extensive investigation in the partners’ countries (Austria, Belgium, Estonia, Italy, Norway, Portugal, UK) through surveys to teachers’ training organization and teachers on the job, to answer the question “is storytelling an asset in our school system?”.

The aim of the questionnaire was to gather information about using stories and storytelling techniques in learning. The questionnaire consisted of questions whose aim was to ascertain how interested and ready active teachers (in primary or secondary classroom practice), teacher trainees and trainers were to test and apply their knowledge in this field.

The main questions for teachers (including students and lecturers) were:

  • Is storytelling (as a didactic tool) a part of the teacher training course in your organization?
  • Are you interested in storytelling as an educational tool? Have you developed or have you been looking for useful material in this respect?

In addition, professional storytellers were also asked about their experience.

From the questionnaire for teachers/trainers we received 161 answers. Most of the respondents (33.78%) were connected with secondary school, followed by primary school (21.62%). The respondents came from Belgium, Austria, Denmark, Norway, Iceland, Italy, Switzerland, UK, France, Estonia and Canada.

There were 71 storyteller respondents from the following countries: Ireland, Belgium, United Kingdom, Spain, Mexico, Norway, Austria, Sweden, Denmark, Australia, France, USA/Hungary, the Netherlands, Germany, Finland, Italy, Switzerland. The respondents qualified themselves as follows: most storytellers are active as a performer or active in education, 50% of them as a storyteller trainer, 42% as a trainer of storytelling techniques in different sectors.

How often do you use storytelling or storytelling techniques in practice?
Storytelling is often used in conjunction with other activities, like for exmaple drama, songs, and props. Several descriptions show that activities are often low-tech and some respondents do not seem to rely on digital storytelling at all. 82.09% said that some of the teachers use stories and/or storytelling techniques in their training practice. The same was asked about digital storytelling and here the results are not so good: 47.54% said “yes”, while 52.46% said “no”.
The result confirms that storytelling elements are actively used.

Why use storytelling?
All respondents (teachers and storytellers) indicate that they feel storytelling in the classroom can support all aspects of learning and development which were included in the questionnaire, including motivation, memory skills, values, emotions, foreign language learning, mother tongue learning, literacy skills, creativity, imagination, intercultural understanding, connecting information from different subject fields and finding cohesion in an abundance of information. The average score for each of the above was over 4 out of 5 (i.e. between ‘rather yes’ and ‘definitely yes’). The only skill to score under 4 (between ‘maybe’ and ‘rather yes’) was the question of whether storytelling in the classroom helps pupils to monitor their learning.

Is storytelling (as a didactic tool) a part of the teacher training course in your organization?
62.50% of the active teachers, teacher trainees and trainers noticed that storytelling was presented as a teaching methodology (short theoretical input) and 20.83% claimed that is was offered as a practical training module (minimum 10 hours). 19.44% said that it was not used at all in their organization.
On the question ‘Do you think teacher training students should get some sort of storytelling training to be able to use it in their future teaching?’ all (100%) teachers and trainers answered ‘yes’, from storytellers only 3 % didn’t feel the need.

Would you like to introduce storytelling as a didactic tool in your classroom practice and what would you need?
88.54%of the respondents would like to introduce storytelling as a didactic tool in their classroom practice. To effectively introduce storytelling in the classroom they need methodological materials, good examples, training, money, resources and time.
All teacher trainers are convinced that future teachers should get some sort of ‘storytelling training’ to be able to use it in their teaching.

What are storytellers’ expectations?
What also came out in this respect is that both a storyteller and teacher are needed in this process: the storyteller should focus on the practical side of the training while the teacher is to keep an eye on the didactical process. They need to inform storytellers about the educational framework in their country, in the framework of which storytellers could work. Storytellers offer practical insights for using storytelling in the classroom and could boost the teachers’ confidence and creativity. Also elaboration of content throughout creating stories and storytelling came across as one of the things storytellers could offer. As a result of going through the survey, we can conclude that there’s a need for structured materials on the matter of storytelling in the classroom.

In conclusion, referring to most answers given, we could state that ‘storytelling is a great pedagogical instrument’ and storytellers should inspire teachers and encourage them in using storytelling in the classroom.

Read the full report of the survey at: www.storiesforlearning.et -> “state of the art” (from November 1st, 2014).

TALES is a Comenius Multilateral Project that wants to introduce oral and digital storytelling and the use of storytelling techniques as a pedagogical tool in school education. TALES started in November 2013 and will last 2 years.

Project partners:

Landcommanderij Alden Biesen (BE) – coordinator

The Languages Company (UK)

Katholieke Hogeschool Limburg (BE)

Tallinn University Haapsalu College (EE)

Oslo and Akershus University College of applied sciences (NO)

Pädagogische Hochschule Steiermark (AT)

Ouvir e Contar, Associação de Contadores de Histórias (PT)

Politecnico di Milano (IT)

Newsletter 3 – December 2014

Follow TALES on www.storiesforlearning.eu

 

 TALES: Introducing Oral and Digital Storytelling in the Classroom

The TALES project is proud to announce the launching of the international TALES competition on digital storytelling and the acquisition of key competences.
For the 2014-15 school year, TALES has partnered with PoliCulturaExpoMilano2015, a world-wide digital storytelling initiative on the theme of the upcoming Universal Exposition “Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life”.
TALES offers European schools the unique opportunity of taking part in a global educational experience, by proposing a special path devoted to storytelling and the acquisition of key competences within the competition.
International digital storytelling competition
Groups of students, aged between 4 and 18, under the guidance of their teachers, can participate. They are asked to complete an interactive, multimedia “story” using a very easy authoring tool made available by the TALES project as a free web service. The deadline for submissions is June 15, 2015. High visibility is guaranteed to all the completed stories: an online portal, interactive installations within the premises of the Universal Exposition, a YouTube Channel and web-TV streaming. In September 2015 an online awards ceremony will connect schools from all over the world. The participating students will enjoy substantial learning benefits, such as: in-depth understanding of the subjects dealt with; improvement of their ability to communicate effectively through modern, multimedia and interactive channels (media literacy); enhancement of teamwork abilities and collaboration in an international environment.
In order to enroll, access the TALES website and fill in the registration form online:
www.storiesforlearning.eu -> competition

Schools can make the case for world citizenship: it is a challenge and an opportunity for each country (as well as a local concern) and for the planet ( global perspective)
December 2014: enrollment to the competition is now open!
Access the TALES website to register
TALES is a Comenius Multilateral Project that wants to introduce oral and digital storytelling and the use of storytelling techniques as a pedagogical tool in school education. TALES started in November 2013 and will last 2 years.
Project partners:

Landcommanderij Alden Biesen (BE) – coordinator

The Languages Company (UK)

Katholieke Hogeschool Limburg (BE)

Tallinn University Haapsalu College (EE)

Oslo and Akershus University College of applied sciences (NO)

Pädagogische Hochschule Steiermark (AT)

Ouvir e Contar, Associação de Contadores de Histórias (PT)

Politecnico di Milano (IT)

Newsletter 4 – January 2015

Follow TALES on www.storiesforlearning.eu

 

 TALES: Introducing Oral and Digital Storytelling in the Classroom

The TALES project wants to remind all its followers that enrollment to the
TALES COMPETITION ON DIGITAL STORYTELLING is OPEN!
As we wrote in our previous newsletter, for school year 2014-15, TALES has partnered with PoliCulturaExpoMilano2015, a world-wide initiative of digital storytelling on the theme of the upcoming Universal Exposition: “Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life” (www.policulturaexpo.it/world).
TALES offers European schools the unique opportunity of taking part in a global educational experience, by proposing a digital storytelling competition devoted to key competences acquisition.
Who can participate?
Classes/groups of students of all school levels, supervised by at least one teacher.
What do participants have to do?
Create an interactive multimedia story, with an easy-to-use authoring tool made available to all registered participants. Minimum effort: a “short story” (~5 minutes long); maximum effort: a “complete story” (20-25 min long). Stories must be in English, to allow for mutual sharing across Europe (and the world).
What should the story be about?
Any topic, provided it is somehow related to the Universal Exposition theme; a lot of issues are raised by the Exposition, ranging from sustainability to biodiversity, from local traditions (food, agriculture…) to legends and stories about food, from world hunger to health problems, etc. Participants are provided with plenty of resources and support to link their subject to the Exposition theme.
Why to participate?
To take part in a truly international educational experience, meeting peers from all across Europe (and the rest of the world); to involve students in a highly engaging activity providing substantial benefits, especially in terms of key competences: intercultural communication, media literacy, group-work….
All the stories will be made public not only in the TALES website but also at the Universal Exposition premises, thus giving visibility to the participants’ countries in this important event.
What are the key dates?
Registration is now open; deadline for submitting the stories is the end of May.
What if I want to create a digital story but not take part in the competition?
You can! Just ask for access to the online authoring tool by writing to: nicoletta.diblas@polimi.it. The completed stories will be made public (upon request) in the TALES website.
TO ENROLL: access the TALES website and fill in the registration form online:
www.storiesforlearning.eu -> competition
Contact: nicoletta.diblas@polimi.it
Creating a digital story together
Collaborative Digital storytelling is an effective way for having students gain substantial educational benefits of various kinds. First of all, students get cognitive benefits in terms of enhanced curiosity towards the subject-matter, capacity of reformulating knowledge and deeper understanding. Second, being the activity a collaborative one, students improve their social skills: they learn how to work in groups, to take initiative and to negotiate with their peers. Third and very important, creating a digital story is a communication exercise with new technologies that dramatically increases the students media literacy: they learn how to organize a multimedia, interactive artifact, how to combine audio and images, how to blend music and videos, how to envisage an interactive fruition of their work by a final “reader”. And much more can be achieved! None better than teachers can express what it means to be involved, all together, at a common creative task, which seems to naturally bring in external helpers and go beyond the classroom’s walls:
“in the last weeks, a father came to work with us, and this made us feel less lonely and created within the class a feeling of warm complicity that extended beyond the classroom’s walls. From that moment on, any hierarchy was broken, the school bureaucracy was overcome, co-presence of teachers were created where there should have been none and the lesson was turned into a think-tank, a laboratory of ideas. Now that everything is over, we are really proud of what we have done and we almost feel empty, without those hours in which teachers had turned into students, parents into experts, and, most important, students had become creators of knowledge”

(Junior high-school teacher, Italy, 2013)

Roughly speaking, the main steps to collaboratively create a digital story are: (1) Choice of the topic; (2) Content gathering; (3) Story organization; (4) (Multimedia) content creation; (5) Content upload in the tool and (6) Evaluation. Typically, classes are organized into groups to perform these tasks: they split into groups after step 3, i.e. once the story organization (into chapters and possibly sub-chapters) is settled: each group is charged with a specific part of the story. Groups can provide mutual help and the final evaluation is done together. The teacher supervises the whole work.
Figures 1 to 6 exemplify some of the above steps
Fig. 1 Planinng the visual communication (pre-school) Fig. 2 If needed, images can be scanned (pre-school)
Fig. 3: audio recording (junior high-school) Fig. 4 Students deal with technical issues (primary school)
Fig. 5. Final evaluation (pre-school) Fig. 6. Final evaluation (high-school)
NEWS on the TALES’ project:
An online course (MOOCs) for teachers on digital storytelling has been launched
To register: www.storiesforlearning.eu -> training days
Through the MOOC, thriving international communities of teachers are created: support can be found and given, cooperation established. Do not miss this opportunity for a truly international educational experience!
February 12-13, 2015: Training days at the Landcommanderij Alden Biesen.
To know more: www.storiesforlearning.eu -> training days
TALES is a Comenius Multilateral Project that wants to introduce oral and digital storytelling and the use of storytelling techniques as a pedagogical tool in school education. TALES started in November 2013 and will last 2 years.
Project partners:

Landcommanderij Alden Biesen (BE) – coordinator

The Languages Company (UK)

Katholieke Hogeschool Limburg (BE)

Tallinn University Haapsalu College (EE)

Oslo and Akershus University College of applied sciences (NO)

Pädagogische Hochschule Steiermark (AT)

Ouvir e Contar, Associação de Contadores de Histórias (PT)

Politecnico di Milano (IT)

Newsletter 5 – May 2015

Follow TALES on www.storiesforlearning.eu

 

 TALES: Introducing Oral and Digital Storytelling in the Classroom


TALES COMPETITION ON DIGITAL STORYTELLING
A NEW option for participation: join in with a SHORT STORY
Registration between April 1st and May 31st
As we wrote in our previous newsletters, for school year 2014-15, TALES has partnered with PoliCulturaExpoMilano2015, a world-wide initiative of digital storytelling on the theme of the upcoming Universal Exposition: “Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life” (www.policulturaexpo.it/world).
A new option for participating is now available: the “SHORT STORIES”.
A Short Story is a multimedia story of limited length (4-5 minutes), requiring a limited effort: 2-4 weeks of class work. Still, the creation of a short story entails the full set of pedagogical benefits associated with digital storytelling at school, like improved communication skills, stronger media literacy, improved understanding of the subject, collaboration skills, etc.
Teachers can create multiple Short Stories within a single class, having different sub-groups of students work at different stories.
A Short Story is the ideal format for those situations in which, for whatever reason (e.g. lack of time, lack of previous experience, fear of not being able to complete a more complex project) the teacher prefers not to start a more demanding activity.
All the short stories will be made public (upon request) in the TALES website.
TO ENROLL, access the TALES website and fill in the registration form online:
www.storiesforlearning.eu -> competition
Contact: nicoletta.diblas@polimi.it
TALES is a Comenius Multilateral Project that wants to introduce oral and digital storytelling and the use of storytelling techniques as a pedagogical tool in school education. TALES started in November 2013 and will last 2 years.
Project partners:

Landcommanderij Alden Biesen (BE) – coordinator

The Languages Company (UK)

Katholieke Hogeschool Limburg (BE)

Tallinn University Haapsalu College (EE)

Oslo and Akershus University College of applied sciences (NO)

Pädagogische Hochschule Steiermark (AT)

Ouvir e Contar, Associação de Contadores de Histórias (PT)

Politecnico di Milano (IT)

Newsletter 6 – June 2015

Follow TALES on www.storiesforlearning.eu

COURSE & FINAL CONFERENCE

24 – 26 September 2015, Beja, Portugal

INVITATION

 TALES: Introducing Oral and Digital Storytelling in the Classroom

TALES is a Comenius Multilateral Project that wants to introduce oral and digital storytelling and the use of storytelling techniques as a pedagogical tool in school education.
The end target groups of TALES are 6 – 18 year old pupils and students. For these groups the project focuses on the development of key competences through storytelling.
In order to achieve this, TALES targets initial teacher training students, teachers at school, teacher trainers as well as curriculum developers, storytellers cooperating with schools, decision-makers in the education sector …, interested in using oral and digital storytelling in education.
For these target groups the project team created a sound approach for introducing storytelling in the classroom, based on methodology analysis, a collection of good practice examples in Europe, expertise gathered while organising pilot projects … All this will be presented in a TALES manual and on the project website.
You are kindly invited to the final TALES conference & course that will take place in Beja, Portugal. The course & conference starts on 24 September at 13.00 and ends on Saturday 26 September at 16.30. At the conference we will present the results and material of the project. There will also be key notes and workshops by educationalists and professional storytellers. In the evenings participants will also have the opportunity to attend the international storytelling festival, organised by the city of Beja.
Target groups: active teachers, teacher trainers, storytellers, educational policy makers … interested in introducing oral or digital storytelling in the classroom.
Costs: There is no conference or course fee, participation is free of charge.
Participants pay their travel costs and accommodation & subsistence.
ERASMUS+ KA1: Schools with a KA1 grant and a European Development Plan including staff development on education through storytelling, innovative didactics, cultural competences, … can use their grant for attending the course & conference.
Venue: Beja city hotels and rooms. The conference will take place at the Municipal Theatre (Teatro Municipal Pax Julia) in the historic centre of Beja.
Travel: Beja is situated in the Alentejo region in Portugal, about 180 km. south east of Lisbon. International participants can arrive on the evening of the 23rd or the morning of the 24th September. International participants can travel via Lisbon International airport. There are train and bus connections to Beja.
Places to stay: in Beja (prices from 35€ to 50€ single room per night):
Places to eat in Beja: there are several restaurants in the historical centre where the average price of a complete meal is under 15€.
Registration of non-Portuguese participants ONLY via: myriam.swinnen@cjsm.vlaanderen.be
Draft programme
Wednesday 23 September
17.00: arrival international guests & trainers
20.30: dinner
Thursday 24 September:
10.00 – 12.30: arrival international and local guests. Registration
13.00: Lunch
14.00 – 17.30: workshop:
–> Oral storytelling in the classroom: Jan Blake, storyteller (UK)
20.00: dinner & festival programme
Friday 25 September
08.30 – 09.30: registration of local conference guests
09.45: Opening International TALES conference
10.00: TALES: Key Competence development & Storytelling in the Classroom: Guy Tilkin, TALES coordinator, Landcommanderij Alden Biesen (BE).
10.45: Keynote: “Oral Storytelling in the classroom”: Jan Blake, UK, storyteller
11.30: coffee break
12.00: Keynote: “Using Story in education and professional development”
–> (title to be confirmed): Jennifer A. Moon, UK,
13.00: lunch
14.30: Parallel workshops: the Tales pilots
16.00: Parallel workshops: the Tales pilots
20.00: dinner & festival programme
Saturday 26 September
08.30 – 09.30: registration of local conference guests
09.45: The TALES approach
10.30: coffee break
11.00: Keynote: Digital storytelling in the classroom (speaker to be confirmed)
12.30: lunch
13.30: Parallel workshops on storytelling and digital storytelling in the classroom: Jan Blake, Nicoletta di Blas, Patricia Huion & Marleen Mesotten, Heidi Dahlsveen)
16.30: end of the conference departure or
20.00: dinner and festival
Sunday 27 September: departure
TALES is a Comenius Multilateral Project that wants to introduce oral and digital storytelling and the use of storytelling techniques as a pedagogical tool in school education. TALES started in November 2013 and will last 2 years.
Project partners:

Landcommanderij Alden Biesen (BE) – coordinator

The Languages Company (UK)

Katholieke Hogeschool Limburg (BE)

Tallinn University Haapsalu College (EE)

Oslo and Akershus University College of applied sciences (NO)

Pädagogische Hochschule Steiermark (AT)

Ouvir e Contar, Associação de Contadores de Histórias (PT)

Politecnico di Milano (IT)

Newsletter 7 – September 2015

Follow TALES on www.storiesforlearning.eu

 

 TALES: Introducing Oral and Digital Storytelling in the Classroom

To tell or not to tell?

The power of storytelling as an educational tool is widely recognized. Many aspects of storytelling are close to our daily life, to the way we think and (try to) understand the world. Teachers and trainers often see the benefits of the ‘technical competences’ tackled through storytelling but sometimes underestimate the social effects and the effect of the alternative thinking styles offered by storying content. It is very important to bring this into focus as well.

Narrative thinking
A major argument for introducing storytelling in the classroom is the fact that stories and storytelling are offered through a ‘narrative pattern’. Any story is a narrative and its structure reflects the way we, as a learning individual, give meaning to (or make sense out of) personal experiences. Story-shaped information is more easily absorbed by our brains, so to speak. Offering content through narratives is considered to be beneficial to the learning process in many ways. It acts as a ‘sense making tool’, supports our imagination and capacity to memorise and contributes to identity development.
A narrative or story is any report of connected events, actual or imaginary, presented in a sequence of written or spoken words, or still or moving images. (Wikipedia). J. Bruner (1986) argues that we use two ways of thinking: “a paradigmatic and a narrative one”. The first one is ‘logic’ and looks for causal relations (deduction, induction, abduction). It deals with facts and objective truth. The narrative way of thinking deals with human intentions, feelings and personal experiences. Polkinghorne (1988) puts it this way: “The paradigmatic mode searches for universal truth conditions whereas the narrative mode looks for particular connections between events.” In western society (and education) the paradigmatic mode is much more valued than the narrative one.

Storytelling as a meaning making tool
Teaching through narratives contributes to the learning process as the content is offered in a structure that relates to our personal meaning making processes. “Narrative is a fundamental structure of human meaning making.” (J. Bruner, 1986). Also M. Clark and M. Rossiter (2008) are convinced that “Meaning making is a narrative process. We make sense of our everyday experiences by storying them, by constructing narratives that make things cohere. It is a matter of locating experiences within a particular narrative or by constructing a new narrative”.
We try to mentally connect any new piece of information to an existing related thread of thoughts. The new elements are ‘wrapped’ as a narrative and connected to existing narratives. The type of relationship between new and old narratives and the place the new narrative gets in the (cultural) clusters of old ones defines its meaning(s). “Therefore, the most effective way to reach learners with educational messages is in and through these narrative constructions. Learners connect new knowledge with lived experience and weave it into existing narratives of meaning.” (Hopkins 1994)

Storytelling as a memory tool
It is not only the narrative meaning making process that is enhanced by teaching through stories but also our memory profits from it. Building links with ‘existing narratives’ in our brain is a way to connect new content with what we already know and remember; it is constructing our memory. This process is enhanced by two factors: the imaginative element and the emotional element of storytelling.
When listening to a story people create images in their minds. Telling and listening involve creative processes. The teller introduces images and ‘conducts/orchestrates’ the imagination of the people in the audience. “In the oral tradition, storytelling includes the teller and the audience. The storyteller creates the experience, while the audience perceives the message and creates personal mental images from the words heard and the gestures seen. The audience becomes co-creator of the art.” (AskDefine.com)
The capacity to imagine is an important element in memory building. P. Harris (2000) states that “When adults listen to a narrative they build in their mind’s eye, so to speak, a mental image or a model of the situation that is being described or of the events that unfold. It is that mental model that they retain over a long period of time rather than the particular words.” He argues that these mental models, constructed in imagination, develop out of the early childhood engagement with narrative and pretend play (MIT.edu paper). Also metaphoric thinking is an aspect of imagination and creativity. Making comparisons and analogies between elements of different categories is creative thinking. A story in itself can be a metaphor or offer a number of metaphors.
But also the emotional aspect is important. Stories appeal to the heart, they engage the listener in an emotional way, raise feelings, urge to act. “Stories are powerful precisely because they engage learners at a deeply human level. Stories draw us into an experience at more than a cognitive level; they engage our spirit, our imagination, our heart, and this engagement is complex and holistic”. (Clark and Rossiter, 2008)

Storytelling as identity: we are our stories
« Un homme, c’est toujours un conteur d’histoires,
il vit entouré de ses histoires et des histoires d’autrui,
il voit tout ce qui lui arrive à travers elles;
et il cherche à vivre sa vie comme s’il la racontait »

J.P. Sartre

So, also J.P. Sartre states we are surrounded by stories. Stories are in our memories, in our family history, our street, city our country. Stories come up when we meet friends, colleagues, neighbors … They deal with daily life, happiness, grief, anger, fear or just fait divers. Stories help us build a community and gain trust.
Making meaning and making sense out of what we experience every day is not only an individual learning process but it is also a social constructivist learning process. As such it is also grounded in a cultural and social context. We build our narratives together with our peers, our building blocks are offered by our social environment, we cluster our narratives according to the models offered.
So clearly there are a number of good arguments to introduce teaching and learning through stories. If you want to know more please go to www.storiesforlearning.eu
TALES is a Comenius Multilateral Project that wants to introduce oral and digital storytelling and the use of storytelling techniques as a pedagogical tool in school education. TALES started in November 2013 and will last 2 years.
Project partners:

Landcommanderij Alden Biesen (BE) – coordinator

The Languages Company (UK)

Katholieke Hogeschool Limburg (BE)

Tallinn University Haapsalu College (EE)

Oslo and Akershus University College of applied sciences (NO)

Pädagogische Hochschule Steiermark (AT)

Ouvir e Contar, Associação de Contadores de Histórias (PT)

Politecnico di Milano (IT)

Hard-Copy newsletter 1 ‐ December 2014

Hard-Copy newsletter 2 – October 2015

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